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Bless us all

From: C H Ngoh ngohch@netscape.net
Date: 13 May 99 14:20:08 PDT

For Money and You Grads, you alredy understand that your thoughts are a form of energy. They have the ability to create, but they also have the abilityto destroy. I believe there is more power behind our every thought than we, as humans, will ever comprehend.

Assuming you desire to use your thoughts to create, let's talk about blessing. If the word "blessing" is uncomfortable, then perhaps using the term "bestow precious gifts" will restore that comfort.

Many of us, when we were children, recited prayers that included "Bless Mommy, bless Daddy, bless my dog, Sparky. .." We may not have known it at the time, but we were asking for joy and highest good for the ones we loved.

We always want blessings for our loved ones, although we may forget to actively think about this in our hectic, day-to-day lives. Some of us say "bless you" when we hear a sneeze, or "bless your heart" when talking to people we care about. Wishing good things for those close to us is an important part of sharing the love in our heart.

But who among us blesses people we don't like? Or people with whom we have had difficult or painful dealings in the past? I would venture to guess not many. For some reason, we tend to hold past ill will or uncomfortable relationships close to us, keeping the pain as fresh as if it happened yesterday. We rationalize that this reminds us to protect ourselves from hurt or maybe we believe that certain people don't deserve our good will.

First of all, keeping pain close to us only insures that we will continue to experience it. Pain doesn't protect, it infects. It makes us weak and susceptible to more of it.

Let's consider what could happen if we gave up that ill will and started blessing or bestowing precious gifts upon those with whom we now associate pain.

Perhaps you have someone in your life, a family member, former best friend or business partner, or an ex-spouse who "did you wrong. " Sure, you may have gotten over it by moving on and creating a new
life for yourself without that person. But you could probably bend a few ears with all the pain and suffering you experienced in that relationship, right? Let's say, instead, that from now on, every time you go through your list of people you want to be blessed, you include this person who boils your blood every time you think of them.

The first few times, you'll grit your teeth and do it just to prove me wrong. Hang in there! You're stepping out of your comfort zone and breaking a well-ingrained habit. It will start to get easier, I promise.

Next you will notice that your loving thoughts are outweighing your painful thoughts and, despite your skepticism, you're feeling pretty good about blessing someone for whom you had so much anger and resentment.

What's happening now is that you're exchanging fear for love and it's lightening your load. You are giving love where you thought you had none to give, and that is one of the best feelings in the world!

Now, what you may not know is that there is something happening on the receiving end of these blessings you're pouring out. Make no mistake that a blessing always finds its recipient. The person receiving your
blessing will be affected somehow, whether it's immediate or eventual. There will be a transformation from painful ties that bind to silken strands of love.

Think of it as putting an extra drop of love or a beautiful ray of light into two hearts every time you extend a blessing. One of those hearts is yours.

Our soul's greatest desire is to know only love. So, when you're tempted to leave someone off of your blessing list for whatever reason, your challenge is to instead put that person at the top of your list. Bless until the pain has been replaced by love and then keep blessing because you know no other way.

This is how we change the world. . . one blessing at a time.

Source : Internet newsgroup